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Frontier Era Bookstore -- Native American Studies

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Native American Studies

Plains Indians Regalia & Customs by Bad Hand (which is why Marsh put it first!) -- This original study of Plains Indian cultures of the 19th century is presented through the use of period writings, paintings and early photography that relate how life was carried out. The author juxtaposes the sources with new research and modern color photography of specific replica items. Thereby, the past comes to life and today's readers learn this history with concrete examples to which they relate. The comprehensive text documents the seven major tribes: Blackfeet, Cheyenne, Comanche, Crow, Hidatsa, Mandan, and Lakota. Observations of Plains Indian men's and women's habits include procuring food, dancing, developing spiritual beliefs, and experiencing daily life. Prominent leaders and average members of the tribes are introduced and major incidents are explained. True stories come to light through objects that relate to each incident and personality. With an understanding of these cultures, readers learn basic similarities of all people, ancient to present, including today's multi-cultural society.
American Woodland Indians (Men-at-Arms 228) by Michael Johnson -- The Woodland cultural areas of the eastern half of America has been the most important in shaping its history. This volume details the history, culture and conflicts of the 'Woodland' Indians, a name assigned to all the tribes living east of the Mississippi River between the Gulf of Mexico and James Bay, including the Siouans, Iroquians, and Algonkians. In at least three major battles between Indian and Euro-American military forces more soldiers were killed than at the battle of Little Bighorn in 1876, when George Custer lost his command. With the aid of numerous illustrations and photographs, including eight full page colour plates by Richard Hook, this title explores the history and culture of the American Woodland Indians.
The American Plains Indians (Men-at-Arms 163) by Jason Hook -- The central plains of North America to the east of the Rocky Mountains were home to the Plains Indians; here the hunting grounds of the twelve "typical" tribes coincided with the grazing range of the largest of the buffalo herds. The adoption of a horse culture heralded the golden age of the Plains Indians -- an age abruptly ended by the intervention of the white man, who forced them into reservations in the second half of the 19th century. Jason Hook's fascinating text explores the culture of American Plains Indians, from camp life to conquest, in a volume complemented by photographs and stunning artwork. ?Men-at-Arms 163 and 186 and Warrior 4 are also available in a single volume special edition as "To Live and Die in the West."
The French-Indian War 1754-1760 (Essential Histories 44) by Daniel Marston -- The French-Indian War was fought in the forests, open plains, and forts of the North American frontier. The French army, supported by North American tribes, was initially more successful than the British Army, who suffered from lack of experience at woodland fighting. This title explains the background to the wars and charts the military development of the British Army and the reforms that led to its eventual superiority. In both skirmishes in the forests of the frontier and great battles such as Louisbourg and Quebec, the British proved they had learnt well from their Native American allies.
Tribes of the Sioux Nation (Men-at-Arms 344) by Michael Johnson --The horse culture of the tribes of the High Plains of North America lasted only some 170 years; yet in that time the sub-tribes of the Teton or Western Sioux people imprinted a vivid image on the world's imagination by their fearless but doomed fight to protect their hunting grounds from the inevitable spread of the white man. This text outlines the history, social organization, religion and material culture of the Santee, Yankton and Teton Sioux; rare early photographs include portraits of many of the great war chiefs and warriors of the Plains Indian Wars, and eight detailed plates record details of Sioux traditional costume.
Tribes of the Iroquois Confederacy (Men-at-Arms 395) by Michael Johnson -- The Five (later, Six) Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy were central to the story of the white colonization of the American Northeast. The European fur trade in North America transformed the Iroquois world, and the tribes were soon forced to take sides in the struggles between English and French colonists. Thanks to the efforts of the remarkable Sir William Johnson in the Mohawk Valley, the Iroquois Nations were for the most part allies of the British crown; and Johnson's loyal kinsman Joseph Brant (Thayendanegea) forced the Mohawks into Canadian exile during the American Revolution. This fascinating introduction to Iroquois history, social organization, religion and material culture is illustrated with rare photographs and eight dazzling color plates.
Ticonderoga 1758 -- Montcalm's Victory Against All Odds (Campaign 76) by Ren Chartrand -- On 5 July 1758 General Abercromby's expedition against Fort Carillon set off from its camp. Within hours, tragedy struck. Some rangers ran into a French scouting party and in the fierce skirmish that followed Lord Howe, the darling of the army, was shot through the heart. The army was shattered at the loss, but Abercromby went to pieces. He decided to attack Montcalm's completed breastworks head-on. Battalion after battalion was sacrificed, the most famous of these hopeless assaults being that of the Black Watch. With the failure of his plan and the exhaustion of his army Abercromby retreated to the foot of Lake George -- Montcalm had saved Canada, with Abercromby's help.
The Plains Wars 1757-1900 (Essential Histories 59) by Charles M Robinson III -- The Great Plains cover the central two-thirds of the United States, and during the nineteenth century were home to some of the largest and most powerful Indian tribes on the continent. The conflict between those tribes and the newcomers from the Old World lasted about one hundred and fifty years, and required the resources of five nations - Spain, Mexico, the Republic of Texas, the Confederate States of America and the United States - before fighting ended in the mid 1890s. This masterly exposition explains the background, causes and long term effects of these bitter wars, whose legacy can still be felt today.
Monongahela 1754-55 Washington's Defeat, Braddock's Disaster (Campaign 140) by Ren Chartrand -- On 9 July 1755 amid the wilderness of North America, Britain suffered one of the most humiliating defeats in her history. General Braddock's army, a mixture of British regulars and American militia, was shattered, losing over 900 men from a force of 1,300. Braddock was killed and the remnants of his army rescued by his aide, Colonel George Washington. The origins of this defeat can be traced back to the death of a junior French officer little more than a year before in a relatively minor skirmish with a party of Virginian militia commanded by the same George Washington. Ren Chartrand examines the subsequent chain of events that ultimately sparked a world war.
American Indians of the Southeast (Men-at-Arms 288) by Michael Johnson -- The southeastern people were the descendants of ancient prehistoric Indian cultures, and were probably on the decline when first known to Europeans. Despite being poorly reported in popular histories, they have been well described by several early European traders and by a number of well-known American ethnologists who collected details of surviving native culture in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The white man's expanding plantation society and the tragic removal of the Indian population to Indian Territory saw the end of this farming, hunting and trading culture. This title examines the absorbing history and culture of the native peoples of the southeastern United States.
Comanche 1800-74 (Warrior 75) by Douglas V Meed -- In the 18th and 19th centuries, the numerous tribes of mounted Comanche warriors were the "Lords of the Southern Plains". For more than 150 years, these ferocious raiders struck terror into the hearts of other plain tribes, Mexican villagers and Anglo settlers in frontier Texas. Their dominion stretched from southern Colorado and Kansas into northern Mexico. This book documents the life and experiences of a Comanche warrior at the peak of their dominance. Following a hypothetical figure through a lifetime, it covers key social and cultural aspects as well as documenting the methods and equipment that they used to wage war.
The French-Indian War 1754-1760 (Essential Histories 44) by Daniel Marston -- The French-Indian War was fought in the forests, open plains, and forts of the North American frontier. The French army, supported by North American tribes, was initially more successful than the British Army, who suffered from lack of experience at woodland fighting. This title explains the background to the wars and charts the military development of the British Army and the reforms that led to its eventual superiority. In both skirmishes in the forests of the frontier and great battles such as Louisbourg and Quebec, the British proved they had learnt well from their Native American allies.
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