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Frontier Era Bookstore -- Native American Studies

Here, we hope you will find some further reading on this period and possibly even buy a book from us! As we go along, we will be adding more and more books (and movies) through our association with Amazon.com. Why buy here, well... in buying a book through us, you help support reenactor.Net (and our surprisingly HIGH server bill) AND keep the site free. As we have just revamped this area, we are in the process of setting this up now.

If you have a book that you think that we should list, please click here.

Native American Studies

Plains Indians Regalia & Customs by Bad Hand (which is why Marsh put it first!) -- This original study of Plains Indian cultures of the 19th century is presented through the use of period writings, paintings and early photography that relate how life was carried out. The author juxtaposes the sources with new research and modern color photography of specific replica items. Thereby, the past comes to life and today's readers learn this history with concrete examples to which they relate. The comprehensive text documents the seven major tribes: Blackfeet, Cheyenne, Comanche, Crow, Hidatsa, Mandan, and Lakota. Observations of Plains Indian men's and women's habits include procuring food, dancing, developing spiritual beliefs, and experiencing daily life. Prominent leaders and average members of the tribes are introduced and major incidents are explained. True stories come to light through objects that relate to each incident and personality. With an understanding of these cultures, readers learn basic similarities of all people, ancient to present, including today's multi-cultural society.
American Woodland Indians (Men-at-Arms 228) by Michael Johnson -- The Woodland cultural areas of the eastern half of America has been the most important in shaping its history. This volume details the history, culture and conflicts of the 'Woodland' Indians, a name assigned to all the tribes living east of the Mississippi River between the Gulf of Mexico and James Bay, including the Siouans, Iroquians, and Algonkians. In at least three major battles between Indian and Euro-American military forces more soldiers were killed than at the battle of Little Bighorn in 1876, when George Custer lost his command. With the aid of numerous illustrations and photographs, including eight full page colour plates by Richard Hook, this title explores the history and culture of the American Woodland Indians.
The American Plains Indians (Men-at-Arms 163) by Jason Hook -- The central plains of North America to the east of the Rocky Mountains were home to the Plains Indians; here the hunting grounds of the twelve "typical" tribes coincided with the grazing range of the largest of the buffalo herds. The adoption of a horse culture heralded the golden age of the Plains Indians -- an age abruptly ended by the intervention of the white man, who forced them into reservations in the second half of the 19th century. Jason Hook's fascinating text explores the culture of American Plains Indians, from camp life to conquest, in a volume complemented by photographs and stunning artwork. ?Men-at-Arms 163 and 186 and Warrior 4 are also available in a single volume special edition as "To Live and Die in the West."
The French-Indian War 1754-1760 (Essential Histories 44) by Daniel Marston -- The French-Indian War was fought in the forests, open plains, and forts of the North American frontier. The French army, supported by North American tribes, was initially more successful than the British Army, who suffered from lack of experience at woodland fighting. This title explains the background to the wars and charts the military development of the British Army and the reforms that led to its eventual superiority. In both skirmishes in the forests of the frontier and great battles such as Louisbourg and Quebec, the British proved they had learnt well from their Native American allies.
Tribes of the Sioux Nation (Men-at-Arms 344) by Michael Johnson --The horse culture of the tribes of the High Plains of North America lasted only some 170 years; yet in that time the sub-tribes of the Teton or Western Sioux people imprinted a vivid image on the world's imagination by their fearless but doomed fight to protect their hunting grounds from the inevitable spread of the white man. This text outlines the history, social organization, religion and material culture of the Santee, Yankton and Teton Sioux; rare early photographs include portraits of many of the great war chiefs and warriors of the Plains Indian Wars, and eight detailed plates record details of Sioux traditional costume.
Tribes of the Iroquois Confederacy (Men-at-Arms 395) by Michael Johnson -- The Five (later, Six) Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy were central to the story of the white colonization of the American Northeast. The European fur trade in North America transformed the Iroquois world, and the tribes were soon forced to take sides in the struggles between English and French colonists. Thanks to the efforts of the remarkable Sir William Johnson in the Mohawk Valley, the Iroquois Nations were for the most part allies of the British crown; and Johnson's loyal kinsman Joseph Brant (Thayendanegea) forced the Mohawks into Canadian exile during the American Revolution. This fascinating introduction to Iroquois history, social organization, religion and material culture is illustrated with rare photographs and eight dazzling color plates.
Ticonderoga 1758 -- Montcalm's Victory Against All Odds (Campaign 76) by Ren Chartrand -- On 5 July 1758 General Abercromby's expedition against Fort Carillon set off from its camp. Within hours, tragedy struck. Some rangers ran into a French scouting party and in the fierce skirmish that followed Lord Howe, the darling of the army, was shot through the heart. The army was shattered at the loss, but Abercromby went to pieces. He decided to attack Montcalm's completed breastworks head-on. Battalion after battalion was sacrificed, the most famous of these hopeless assaults being that of the Black Watch. With the failure of his plan and the exhaustion of his army Abercromby retreated to the foot of Lake George -- Montcalm had saved Canada, with Abercromby's help.
The Plains Wars 1757-1900 (Essential Histories 59) by Charles M Robinson III -- The Great Plains cover the central two-thirds of the United States, and during the nineteenth century were home to some of the largest and most powerful Indian tribes on the continent. The conflict between those tribes and the newcomers from the Old World lasted about one hundred and fifty years, and required the resources of five nations - Spain, Mexico, the Republic of Texas, the Confederate States of America and the United States - before fighting ended in the mid 1890s. This masterly exposition explains the background, causes and long term effects of these bitter wars, whose legacy can still be felt today.
Monongahela 1754-55 Washington's Defeat, Braddock's Disaster (Campaign 140) by Ren Chartrand -- On 9 July 1755 amid the wilderness of North America, Britain suffered one of the most humiliating defeats in her history. General Braddock's army, a mixture of British regulars and American militia, was shattered, losing over 900 men from a force of 1,300. Braddock was killed and the remnants of his army rescued by his aide, Colonel George Washington. The origins of this defeat can be traced back to the death of a junior French officer little more than a year before in a relatively minor skirmish with a party of Virginian militia commanded by the same George Washington. Ren Chartrand examines the subsequent chain of events that ultimately sparked a world war.
American Indians of the Southeast (Men-at-Arms 288) by Michael Johnson -- The southeastern people were the descendants of ancient prehistoric Indian cultures, and were probably on the decline when first known to Europeans. Despite being poorly reported in popular histories, they have been well described by several early European traders and by a number of well-known American ethnologists who collected details of surviving native culture in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The white man's expanding plantation society and the tragic removal of the Indian population to Indian Territory saw the end of this farming, hunting and trading culture. This title examines the absorbing history and culture of the native peoples of the southeastern United States.
Comanche 1800-74 (Warrior 75) by Douglas V Meed -- In the 18th and 19th centuries, the numerous tribes of mounted Comanche warriors were the "Lords of the Southern Plains". For more than 150 years, these ferocious raiders struck terror into the hearts of other plain tribes, Mexican villagers and Anglo settlers in frontier Texas. Their dominion stretched from southern Colorado and Kansas into northern Mexico. This book documents the life and experiences of a Comanche warrior at the peak of their dominance. Following a hypothetical figure through a lifetime, it covers key social and cultural aspects as well as documenting the methods and equipment that they used to wage war.
The French-Indian War 1754-1760 (Essential Histories 44) by Daniel Marston -- The French-Indian War was fought in the forests, open plains, and forts of the North American frontier. The French army, supported by North American tribes, was initially more successful than the British Army, who suffered from lack of experience at woodland fighting. This title explains the background to the wars and charts the military development of the British Army and the reforms that led to its eventual superiority. In both skirmishes in the forests of the frontier and great battles such as Louisbourg and Quebec, the British proved they had learnt well from their Native American allies.
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Frontier Era Bookstore -- Movies, Documentaries and Music

Here, we've got some movies of this period (more to come) and we hope you'l like them. See how we've even reviewed them for you ;- And... if reading on this period and you possibly even buy a movie from us through our association with Amazon.com, you'll help support reenactor.Net (and our suprisingly HIGH server bill) AND this keeps the site free.

If you have a movie or book that you think that we should have here, please click on this link.

Movies: Video and DVD's

DVD's


The Mountain Men -- Charleton Heston and Brian Keith... need we say more? Waugh! This is a "must-own" for any Frontier video library! If you are interested in the mountain men and fur trappers, then you must get this movie!

The Last of the Mohicans -- The Last of the Mohicans is an epic. The cinematography alone almost guarantees it. Although different in many ways from the book, the film is a terrific adaptation of James Cooper's novel. The realism of the period, was totally convincing. And... they used a LOT of reenactors in this movie!

The whole movie was pretty good and we hardly feel like we need to give a synopsis of this movie, as the story is so well known. Look, if you like the Frontier, F&I and Colonial stuff, you'll like this movie!


Jeremiah Johnson -- After they first worked together on the 1966 film This Property Is Condemned, director Sydney Pollack and Robert Redford continued their long-lasting collaboration with this 1972 drama set during the early-1800s, about one man's rugged effort to shed the burden of civilization and learn to survive in the wilderness of the Rocky Mountains.

Will Geer is perfectly cast as the seasoned trapper who teaches Jeremiah Johnson (Redford) how to survive against harsh winters, close encounters with grizzly bears, and hostile Crow Indians. In the course of his adventure, Johnson marries the daughter of a Flathead Indian chief, forms a makeshift family, and ultimately assumes a mythic place in Rocky Mountain folklore.

Shot entirely on location in Utah, the film boasts an abundance of breathtaking widescreen scenery, and the story (despite a PG rating) doesn't flinch from the brutality of the wilderness (Meaning that it shows all Indians as noble peoples and pretty much all white people and settlers as violent, degenerates, etc.). In addition to the original theatrical trailer, remastered Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtrack, and informative production notes, the DVD also includes The Saga of Jeremiah Johnson, a promotional documentary on the making of the film.

*A Marsh note: The 1970's hippy-style background singing and somewhat anti-American-ness of this flick, along with the fact that it bears no real resemblence to the real story it was taken for should be noted.


A Man Called Horse -- (only available in nasty, icky VHS right now) This 1970 film stars Richard Harris (The original Professor Dumbledore to you young whippersnappers...) as an English Lord in the American West in 1825. He is captured by the Sioux Indians where he is first humiliated, but learns the Indian way of life, participates in the very painful o-kee-pa ritual (Souix Medicine Ritual, wherein they're a hangin' from sticks punched through his skin...), finds love and teaches the Indians a thing or two about war (Waugh!).

In the cast: In addition to Richard Harris there's Dame Judith Anderson from Australia, cast as Buffalo Cow; Corinna Tsopei, a former Miss Universe from Greece, cast as Running Deer; Manu Tupou, a Polynesian from the Fiji Islands cast as Yellow Hand (you could do anything in the '70's).

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Frontier Era Bookstore -- Historical Accounts and Biographies

Here, we hope you will find some further reading on this period and possibly even buy a book from us! As we go along, we will be adding more and more books (and movies) through our association with Amazon.com. Why buy here, well... in buying a book through us, you help support reenactor.Net (and our surprisingly HIGH server bill) AND keep the site free. As we have just revamped this area, we are in the process of setting this up now.

If you have a book that you think that we should list, please click here.

Reenacting and Living History Resources | Historical Accounts and Biographies
Native American Studies
| Military Books | Multimedia

Historical Accounts and Biographies

Journal of a Trapper: In the Rocky Mountains -- In 1830, 16-year-old Osborne Russell left his Maine farm and ran away to sea. He didn't like it. He ended up joining an expedition headed to Oregon by way of the Rocky Mountains. Along the way he acquired the skills necessary for survival in the mountains. He also learned the Snake language, hunted buffalo, and trapped beaver, looked for new trails west, and kept a journal that forms the basis of this vigorously authentic book. The descriptions are so accurate that contemporary readers are using the book to retrace Russell's footsteps!
Crow Killer: The Saga of Liver-Eating Johnson -- The book is a fascinating look at the real life model for the "hero" of the movie Jeremiah Johnson; John Johnston was his real name and this story is essentially compiled from the oral tradition of the old west augmented by interviews with people who knew Johnston (or alleged to know him). I read this book BEFORE I actually saw Jeremiah Johnson, so it was a bit different for me.

Great read though! bad George Bentley borrowed it back in 1981 and I have never seen it again ;-( Guess I need to buy a new copy... Okay, I did buy anew copy,... it's now in a box from my move between Ft. Loudon and Chambersburg...

Give Your Heart to the Hawks -- Blevins portrays the incredible lives of such men as Jed Smith, Jim Bridger, Tom Fitzpatrick, and Bill Williams, while he looks for the greater story, the story of their experiences, rather than the political realities of their era.
A Life Wild and Perilous: Mountain Men and the Paths to the Pacific -- It's true, Robert Utley writes, that mountain men such as "Crazy Bill" Williams and Jeremiah "Liver-Eating" Johnson were an unlearned, unwashed, drunk, and violent bunch who tore a bloody swath across the then-unconquered American West from the 1810s to the 1840s. Yet their travels across deserts and plains and over high mountains yielded a huge body of geographical knowledge that would enable American pioneers to cross the Mississippi and traverse the continent in relative security. Utley, a historian with a fluent narrative style, tells the stories of hard-fighting men like Jim Bridger, Benjamin Bonneville, Kit Carson, and Joseph Walker, whose names now figure prominently on maps of the region but are otherwise little remembered.
Broken Hand, the Life of Thomas Fitzpatrick, Mountain Man, Guide and Indian Agent -- It is a vivid, comprehensive and sweeping biography of a most important and influential man of the early American West. At the age of twenty four, Thomas Fitzpatrick started out with Ashley's expedition of 1823 as a fur trapper going up the Missouri River. The following year he discovered South Pass, then was part owner of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company. After the fur trade declined, he guided the first wagon train west over the Oregon Trail, then acted as guide to Fremont, Kearny and Abert on their expeditions. Later,he was appointed as an Indian Agent for the government and in this position he was most significant in facilitating relations with the Plains Indians.
Jim Bridger, Mountain Man -- 333 pages. Author: Stanley Vestal. Even among the mighty mountain men, Jim Bridger was a towering figure. By 1824, when he was only 20, he had discovered the Great Salt Lake. Later he was to open the Overland Route, which was the path of the Overland Stage, the Pony Express, and the Union Pacific. He was one of the greatest explorers and pathfinders in American History.
Jedediah Smith and the Opening of the West -- The saga of Jedediah Smith began at age 23, and ended ten years later, in 1831, when, on the Santa Fe trail, he was killed by indians when he stopped for a drink from a stream. He was one of the first true mountain men and trappers whose life story, during those ten years, introduces the reader to others whose names are more familiar now than his own. He died before the western movement began that relied so heavily upon the knowledge of such persons. Yet it is doubtful that any, except perhaps Kit Carson, came close to exploring so much country, much of it alone, or nearly so. The book is a scholarly presentation of his incredible feats each, for the most part, intended to discover the elusive beaver. Jedediah's territory covered the then unknown expanse ranging from the confluence of the Yellowstone and the Missouri Rivers, current site of Fort Union where I purchased my book, to Oregon, California as far south as LA, east along the Old Spanish Trial and the Gila River as well as into NM and everywhere in between. His knowledge of so vast a country was invaluable and, in spite of his untimely death, contributed mightily to what eventually would become known as Manifest Destiny. Some are destined to contribute whether intended or not. The book deserves a place in the library of every serious student of the west.
Hugh Glass -- To state that Hugh Glass led an extraordinary life would be to miss the mark through understatement. In the book entitled "Hugh Glass", author Bruce Bradley attempts to assemble into a cohesive whole the facts, stories, and legends that have sprung up around Glass. He has succeeded in producing a thrilling book on that remarkable and unenviable life.
A Rendezvous Reader: Tall, Tangled, And, True Tales of the Mountain Men, 1805-1850-- A trapper returns from the dead, hunters feast on buffalo intestines served on a dirty blanket, a missionary woman is astounded by the violence and vulgarity of the trappers' rendezvous ... these are just a few of the stories, tall tales, and just plain lies that make up Rendezvous Reader.

A good book to keep by the bed to help you fall asleep with images of a time that is gone forever.

Not to be confused with a history book written by any one person, A Rendezvous reader is a collection of selections from journal entries, newspaper articles and books, most only a page or two long, that show the culture and folklore of the mountain men and the beautifully wild world in which they lived. It describes everything from trapping techniques, encounters with grizzlies, descriptions of giant heards of buffalo, bloody fights with blackfeet, common and uncommon sources of food, surgery on the trail, beggers, weapons, river crossings, whisky, everything you might ever want to know about rendevous, why many were motivated to let out for the mountains in the first place and so much more.

The selections in this book offer the sights and sounds, smells and tastes of yonder mountains which makes worthwhile reading.

John Colter: His Years in the Rockies by Burton Harris -- Yellowstone...Colter's Hell...geysers...Indians.... this book is a total pleasure to read. Although it is true that Colter's life was somewhat obscure by a lack of more historical documentation, Harris does an exemplary piece of work with what there is to work with. Citing such references as William Clark, Thomas James, Brackenridge, Bradbury and others, Harris does make a justifiable attempt to back up his story. Required reading for those into this time period of the early American West when mountain men roamed the wide open spaces, high mountain valleys and peaks. It must have been a tough, but very rewarding way of life...if you survived the perils and hardships of that day.
Fur Traders, Trappers, and Mountain Men of the Upper Missouri by Le Roy R. Hafen -- This book offers some very good, concise descriptions of eighteen lesser known fur trappers, traders and mountain men of the early American wes -- men such as James Kipp, Gabriel Franchere, William Laidlaw, David Dawson, William Gordon and John Sanford to mention a few. Each one of these men's lives had obstacles of hardships, disasters, frustrations, etc. to overcome and all had something to do with the founding and development of the early American west in one way or another. It is a fun book to read and the bibliographies in each chapter simply 'whet the appetite' to read more about these interesting early frontiersmen.

Reenacting and Living History Resources | Historical Accounts and Biographies
Native American Studies
| Military Books | Multimedia

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Frontier Era Bookstore -- Multimedia

Here, we've got some movies of this period (more to come) and we hope you'l like them. See how we've even reviewed them for you ;- And... if reading on this period and you possibly even buy a movie from us through our association with Amazon.com, you'll help support reenactor.Net (and our surprisingly HIGH server bill) AND this keeps the site free.

If you have a movie or book that you think that we should have here, please click on this link.

Movies: Video and DVD's

DVD's



The Mountain Men -- Charleton Heston and Brian Keith... need we say more? Waugh! This is a "must-own" for any Frontier video library! If you are interested in the mountain men and fur trappers, then you must get this movie!

The Last of the Mohicans -- The Last of the Mohicans is an epic. The cinematography alone almost guarantees it. Although different in many ways from the book, the film is a terrific adaptation of James Cooper's novel. The realism of the period, was totally convincing. And... they used a LOT of reenactors in this movie!

The whole movie was pretty good and we hardly feel like we need to give a synopsis of this movie, as the story is so well known. Look, if you like the Frontier, F&I and Colonial stuff, you'll like this movie!



Jeremiah Johnson -- After they first worked together on the 1966 film This Property Is Condemned, director Sydney Pollack and Robert Redford continued their long-lasting collaboration with this 1972 drama set during the early-1800s, about one man's rugged effort to shed the burden of civilization and learn to survive in the wilderness of the Rocky Mountains.

Will Geer is perfectly cast as the seasoned trapper who teaches Jeremiah Johnson (Redford) how to survive against harsh winters, close encounters with grizzly bears, and hostile Crow Indians. In the course of his adventure, Johnson marries the daughter of a Flathead Indian chief, forms a makeshift family, and ultimately assumes a mythic place in Rocky Mountain folklore.

Shot entirely on location in Utah, the film boasts an abundance of breathtaking widescreen scenery, and the story (despite a PG rating) doesn't flinch from the brutality of the wilderness (Meaning that it shows all Indians as noble peoples and pretty much all white people and settlers as violent, degenerates, etc.). In addition to the original theatrical trailer, remastered Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtrack, and informative production notes, the DVD also includes The Saga of Jeremiah Johnson, a promotional documentary on the making of the film.

*A Marsh note: The 1970's hippy-style background singing and somewhat anti-American-ness of this flick, along with the fact that it bears no real resemblence to the real story it was taken for should be noted.



A Man Called Horse -- This 1970 film stars Richard Harris (The original Professor Dumbledore to you young whippersnappers...) as an English Lord in the American West in 1825. He is captured by the Sioux Indians where he is first humiliated, but learns the Indian way of life, participates in the very painful o-kee-pa ritual (Souix Medicine Ritual, wherein they're a hangin' from sticks punched through his skin...), finds love and teaches the Indians a thing or two about war (Waugh!).

In the cast: In addition to Richard Harris there's Dame Judith Anderson from Australia, cast as Buffalo Cow; Corinna Tsopei, a former Miss Universe from Greece, cast as Running Deer; Manu Tupou, a Polynesian from the Fiji Islands cast as Yellow Hand (you could do anything in the '70's).


Frontier Main | Reenacting and Living History Resources
Historical Accounts and Biographies | Native American Studies
Military Books | Multimedia

Frontier Era Bookstore
& Reading List

Here, we hope you will find some further reading on this period and possibly even buy a book from us! As we go along, we will be adding more and more books (and movies) through our association with Amazon.com. Why buy here? Well... in buying a book through us, you help support reenactor.Net (and our surprisingly HIGH server bill) AND keep the site free. As we have just revamped this area, we are in the process of setting this up now.

If you have a book that you think that we should list, please click here.

Reenacting and Living History Resources | Historical Accounts and Biographies
Native American Studies
| Military Books | Multimedia

Reenacting and Living History Resources


A Pilgrim's Journey by Mark A. Baker -- This book is a compilation of the first ten years of Mark Baker's column from Muzzleloader Magazine.

I don't know about you, but I have been a fan of Baker's for years... his ideas and articles are not only useful for his time-period, they also translate well to other time periods. Mark Baker truly IS one of the leading lights of "Experimental Archeology."

A Pilgrim's Journey contains over 300 pages of treks, scouts, hunts and how-to. Baker shares his knowledge and insights gained from wilderness experiences, extensive research, and from his partners and mentors along the way. Join Mark as he takes his pilgrim's journey back to the 18th century frontier. From flintlocks and moccasins to shooting bags and knapsacks, Baker explores the way of life of the Colonial woodsman. Learn about the clothing, accoutrements, food and skills from an era that helped forge the American Spirit and a new nation. Softcover. 306 pages with over 250 quality illustrations and photos, including many new photos in and updated layout.


A Pilgrim's Journey Volume Two by Mark A. Baker -- This book is a compilation of the next ten years of Mark Baker's column from Muzzleloader Magazine.

Join Mark as he continues his pilgrim's journey back to the 18th century frontier. From flintlocks and moccasins to shooting bags and knapsacks, Baker explores the way of life of the Colonial woodsman. Learn about the clothing, gear, food and skills from an era that helped forge the American spirit and a new nation.


Tidings from the 18th Century -- A great book that will help anyone with their 18th Century impression. Not only that, any impression of the Frontier era will be helped by reading this material. Not only does it show you things like sewing techniques, but also other crafts and it does so in a period manner. I can't say enough good things about this book!

Buy it!


Book of Buckskinning -- Step back in time and learn how to relive the American frontier. First published in 1981, this bestseller is the standard against which other frontier living history books are judged. Ten authors bring their expertise to the subjects of The Philosophy of Buckskinning, How to Get Started, Rendezvous & Shoots The Lodge, The Guns, The Clothing, Accoutrements & Equipment, The Skills, Women in Buckskinning and The Crafts. 208 pages.

Book of Buckskinning II -- More in-depth information on how to re-create life on the American frontier. Techniques, patterns and instructions for everyday work and living in the wilderness. Chapters include Why Buckskinners Create, Working with Leather, 18th Century Clothing, Horseback Travel, Design and Construction of Powder Horns, Firemaking, Traveling Afoot & By Canoe, Making Camp Gear and Gun Tune-Up & Care. 264 pages.

Book of Buckskinning III -- Solid buckskinning information written by the most knowledgeable people in buckskinning. Subjects include Historic Guns & Today's Makers, Quillworking, Trade Beads, 18th & l9th Century Cooking, The Hunting Pouch, Beadworking, Techniques for Making Footwear and Period Shelters. Also includes a special color section showing beadwork, quillwork, authentic frontier outfits and trade beads. 240 pages.

Book of Buckskinning IV -- Add to your knowledge and enhance your buckskinning lifestyle and skills with chapters on Traditional Blacksmithing, Blankets in Early America, From Raw Hides to Rawhide, Styles of the Southwest, Smoothbores on the Frontier, Trade Silver, Backwoods Knives, Lighting the Primitive Camp and Historic Sites & Museums. 260 pages.

Book of Buckskinning V -- Continues the buckskinning series of practical frontier living skills with chapters on Fur Trade Indian Dresses, Old-Time Music & Instruments, Trade Goods for Rendezvous, Tipi Know-How, Engraving & Carving, Historic Sites & Museums II, Games, Sports & Other Amusements and Pack Saddles & Panniers. A special color section features the dress of fur trade Indian women and horseback photos. 260 pages.

Book of Buckskinning VI -- The sixth book in our buckskinning series continues the tradition of first rate historical information and hands-on frontier craft skills. Chapters include The Traditional Hunting Pouch, Horse Gear, East & West, Making a Wooden Bow, American Powder Horns, Frontier Trail Foods, Old-Time Shooting Matches, Period Trekking and Finger Weaving. Color section features horseback trips, powder horns, hunting pouches and fingerwoven sashes. 226 pages.

The Book of Buckskinning VII -- Buckskinning VII continues the tradition of first-rate historical information and hands-on frontier craft skills. Chapters include Clothing of the Rocky Mountain Trapper, 1820- 1840; Indian-influenced Woodsmen of the Cane; Tools & Techniques of Bark Tanning; A Wardrobe for the Frontier Woman, 1780-1840; A Typical Day's Journey in Winter; Goods of the Trunk Maker & His Trade; Art & Writing on the Frontier and Great Lakes & Eastern Woodlands Knife Sheaths. Color section features original art and artifacts plus reproductions. 260 pages.

The Book of Buckskinning VIII -- Continuing the Buckskinning series with another book with first-rate historical information and hands-on frontier craft skills. Chapters include: Gear of the Rocky Mountain Trapper, Beaver Hunting, Wing Shooting with a Flintlock Shotgun, History of the Horse in the Fur Trade, 18th Century Tatooing, The History & Trade Ledgers of Fort Hall, Independent Women of America's Past, Beadwork in the American West before 1850, and The Evolution of the Cocked Hat.

Firearms, Traps and Tools of the Mountain Men by Carl P. Russell -- This encyclopedic guide to the equipment of the trappers and fur traders who opened the Old west is a unique reference work that can be classified either as a history or as archaeology. It describes and discusses hundreds of iron artifacts - rifles, shotguns, hatchets, axes, knives, traps, and miscellaneous tools - used by the mountain men from the early 1800s to the mid 1840s. Illustrated with over 400 drawings, the book begins with a useful background history of the western fur trade. The book will send every frontier buff scurrying to re-examine his rusty treasures, and every museum of western lore to set up new exhibits.

Last Stand at Old Man's Creek by Eugene C. Stevens -- In the spring of 1832, 275 Illinois militiamen under the command of Major Isaiah Stillman were sent on a mission to capture or destroy the infamous Chief Black Hawk and subdue the warriors that followed him into Illinois to reclaim their homeland. Stillman?s expedition earned the title of the ?Forlorn Hope,? as they found themselves up against superior numbers of warriors with the very real possibility of being completely wiped out. A small contingent of Rangers held their ground and covered the retreat of their fellow Rangers. Many lost their lives, but many others lived to tell the truth about what had really occurred on that day. Last Stand at Old Man?s Creek is the true and correct story of what occurred and the aftermath of the battle that would smear the names of the men who were there. This finally answers the questions that have lingered for nearly two centuries about the circumstances surrounding the surprising defeat of the militia on that fatal day.

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