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Author Topic: What is a "Farb?"  (Read 3192 times)

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Offline Sturmkatze

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What is a "Farb?"
« on: March 11, 2008, 11:17:59 PM »
We all use the word "farb" a lot, but what do YOU think it means? I had the definitions below on reenactor.Net for a long time now and it's time for an update... [b]What do YOU think is a "farb?"[/b][/color]

What Is A Farb?
Well, so you are new to reenacting and for the first time ever, you have heard the term "Farb." From what you've gathered it's like a disease, worse than the getting the "Clap." Because once you've been labelled a "farb", then you and everyone you associate with will be known as "farby." So what is this word "farb?" Here are a couple of definition that I consider first class.

The first one's from Mike Gonzales -- 3K/J.R. 23
There seems to be a lot of confusion out there about the definition of a "FARB." Folks, if you're DOING it right, THINK you're doing it right, TRYING to do it right, or just WANT to do it right--as long as you are doing all that you can to up grade your impression--YOU'RE NOT A "FARB." However, if you have items you KNOW are wrong but don't care to ask, seek info about, or attempt to improve these items, or worse, when a better reproduction IS widely available and you won't upgrade to it, (despite a universe of peer pressure), then my friend you ARE a "FARB."

A "FARB" will never utter these words: Say, that's very authentic looking, where did you get that? How do I make one of those?Can you help me do that? Or...well, if we can't do it right, lets not do it at all. Rather, "Farbs" are proponents of that old standard of "farbicity", the ten-foot rule, it's close enough, is their mantra. On the other hand, I have never met a hard-core authentic, in ANY hobby, who would not bend over backwards to help someone who asked for it.

Bottom line: If you're not a "FARB (and don't want to be known as one)" when you see someone doing it better than you...ASK! And then, don't associate with known "FARBS" and/or "FARBY" units, because you WILL be judged by the company you keep.

The next definition is from Tim Fensch -- 3K/J.R.63
The above definition of a "FARB" is the best I've seen! As long as someone is TRYING, they're no "Farb." No matter how authentic someone is trying to be, they'll never be 100%, but the effort is what's important. Ever notice that "FARBS" always use the 100% criterion as a way of blowing off authenticity: "Oh yeah, well you guys don't have trenchfoot, so you're not authentic!"
I have seen cases where guys were thought to be "farbs" but it turned out they just started - off in one of those "doesn't matter" kind of units and didn't know any better. Then, however when someone took the time to "HELP" them, they did improve. It takes, as others have said, all of us encouraging each other to push it a little more each event and rejoicing in each others' efforts.
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Offline groomporter

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Re: What is a "Farb?"
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2008, 11:07:18 PM »
We've always heard that the origin of the term comes from a phrase used by anal-hyphen-retentive American Civil War reenactors just before they point out a problem in your portrayal: "FAR Be it for me to say anything, but..." and that it  has evolved over the years to become a term for an anachronism, as well as a term for reenactors who are oblivious (or uncaring) about the blatant errors in their kits.

(My glossary of terms might be of interest -as well as worth a chuckle or two http://historicgames.com/glossary.html )

« Last Edit: March 12, 2008, 11:09:26 PM by groomporter »
Andrew MacGregor (aka Charles Knutson)
MacGregor Historic Games
Captain (ret.) Col. Gaffney's Regt of Foote