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Author: Shelby Stanton
Stackpole Books

This is a great book—Stanton was a serving officer in Vietnam and when he did his research he had access to the working files at the Army's Natick Laboratory in Masachusetts to consult. He has used all the specifications and drawings that were published. In combination with his work on the Cold War which covers clothing worn elsewhere in the world this period is thoroughly covered.

Using only black & white photos and line drawings to illustrate the volume, the author still successfully describes the variety of Army uniforms of the Vietnam era. The safety/work clothing & related equipment are very loosely definable as a uniform clothing item of a combat, fatigue or service dress nature and could have been easily omitted. The listing of items by proper nomenclature was also very helpful. Some color would have been nice but there are other publications that complement this book. Bit sparse on field equipment but then this is a uniform study.

The book provides great details about equipment, uniforms and rations that were issued to the GI's during the war, and does a great job of bringing the modernity of the war to the forefront. The book shows a great number of the new and updated equipment the men carried, and does a great job of explaining the how, why, when and where.

Author: Guillaume Rousseau
Histoire and Collections

This publication covers the chronological evolution of uniforms, equipment and weaponry issued to the American soldier during the first years of the conflict, from 1962 to 1967 (a second volume will cover the 1968 to 1975 period). All of the uniforms and equipment shown are period, however some of the weapons are replicas. In the aim of depicting characteristic servicemen at given periods, a great deal of research was undertaken in order to guarantee coherence between the units, dates and geographical situations. Differing from other publications, the author has deliberately chosen to illustrate all types of service personnel rather than solely combatants in order to give an exact presentation of the American military during this period. Indeed, it should be remembered that 85% of service personnel in Vietnam were support troops and advisors.

REVIEWS

Ideal for those interested in the detail of uniforms and history of the US involvement in Vietnam generally, but especially aimed at the militaria collectors and re-enactors who want to re-create specific uniforms for a specific time, place and unit. For the modeller, it is equally ideal thanks to modern colour photos showing real items of clothing and equipment from the period.... The quality of the photos is excellent, and the variety shown makes for a very handy uniform reference

Author: Gordon Rottman
Illustrator: Brian Delf
Osprey (Warrior)

Osprey's study of the Military Assistance Command of the Vietnam War (1955-1975). In 1964 Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, activated a joint unconventional task force known as the Studies and Observation Group--MACV-SOG. As a cover its mission was to conduct analysis of lessons learned in combat involved all branches of service. SOG's real mission was to conduct covert strategic reconnaissance missions into Laos, Cambodia, and South Vietnam as well as sabotage and 'Black' psychological operations. Ground, air, and naval assets were employed to insert, collect, extract, and otherwise support these operations. Drawing on detailed, first-hand accounts of the experiences of the service, including action on operations, this book will shed light on one of the most crucial units of the Vietnam War.

Author: Gordon Rottman
Illustrator: Kevin Lyles
Osprey (Warrior)

Vietnam was the US Special Forces' most complex and controversial mission, one that began in 1957 and ended in 1973. Camp strike forces, mobile strike forces, mobile guerrilla forces, special reconnaissance projects, training missions and headquarters duty provided vastly differing experiences and circumstances for SF soldiers. Other fluctuating factors were the terrain, the weather and the shifting course of the Vietnam War (1955-1975) itself. Gordon Rottman examines the training, life, weapons and combat experiences of the Special Forces soldier in this challenging environment.

Author: Gordon Rottman
Illustrator: Kevin Lyles
Osprey (Warrior)

This book tells the compelling story of the average US infantryman in the Vietnam War (1955-1975). Beginning with conscription, enlistment, Basic Training, and Advanced Individual Training at the Armed Forces Induction Center at Fort Polk (the infamous “Tigerland”), it goes on to explore the day-to-day realities of service in Vietnam, from routine tasks at the firebase to search-and-destroy missions, rocket attacks, and firefights in the field. Weaponry, clothing, and equipment are all described and shown in detailed color plates. A vivid picture of the unique culture and experiences of these soldiers emerges – from their vernacular to the prospect of returning to an indifferent, if not hostile, homeland.

Author: Gordon Rottman
Illustrator: Brian Delf
Osprey (Warrior)

The North Vietnamese Army is often forgotten by the histories of the Vietnam War (1955-1975). Commonly mistaken for the locally raised Viet Cong guerrillas, the NVA was in fact an entirely different force for the Democratic Republic of Vietnam. After first supporting the VC in the Republic of Vietnam in 1958, the NVA entered into their own violent armed struggle as the war escalated. Entire divisions and vast numbers of NVA troops were sent south, conducting large-scale operations in a conventional war fought almost entirely by the NVA, and not the VC, as is often believed. Despite limited armor, artillery and air support, the NVA were an extremely politicized and professional force with strict control measures and leadership concepts - soldiers were expected to be totally committed to the cause, and to sacrifice all to ensure its success. Gordon Rottman follows the fascinating life of the highly motivated infantryman from conscription and induction through training to real combat experiences. Covering the evolution of the forces from 1958 onwards, this book takes an in-depth look at the civilian and military lives of the soldiers, while accompanying artwork details the uniforms, weapons and equipment used by the NVA in their clash against America and her allies.

Author: Kevin Lyles
Osprey (Elite)

The part played by Australian and New Zealand troops in the Vietnam War (1955-1975) is sometimes overlooked; but it is generally accepted that the 'Diggers' and 'Kiwis' were among the most effective and professional troops involved. Drawing upon the ANZACs' long experience in the jungles of South East Asia, the men of the Task Force used their expertise in patrol tactics to great effect to frustrate Viet Cong operations. Meanwhile the ANZACs’ small and isolated adviser teams spent ten years passing on their skills all over South Vietnam, and in the process four were awarded the supreme decoration for valour - the Victoria Cross. This book pays tribute to their military prowess, and describes and illustrates their uniforms and equipment in unprecedented detail.

Author: Martin Windrow
Illustrator: Mike Chappell
Osprey (Men-at-Arms)

The states of Indochina had been French colonies or protectorates since the 19th century. However, in March 1945 the Japanese interned all French troops and officials, and turned over all civil government to local authorities. The power vacuum caused by the Japanese surrender allowed the Viet Minh, a strong revolutionary organisation, to be established throughout Vietnam. When the French returned to the north, incidents between French and VM troops were inevitable, negotiations collapsed and the French opted for a military solution. This book examines the history of the conflict and the forces of both sides of the French Indochina War (1946-1954).

Author: Lee Russell
Illustrator: Mike Chappell
Osprey (Men-at-Arms)

On March 8th, 1965, some 3,500 US Marines, the first US combat troops to arrive in Vietnam, landed in Da Nang to defend the US air base there. On June 8th, following further reinforcements, General Westmoreland authorized his troops to begin "offensive patrolling." Lee Russell's follow-up to Men-at-Arms 104 focuses in finer detail on the uniforms and insignia of the US Army and Marines, the ARVN and the NVA. The book is packed with superbly detailed black and white photographs of the forces active in the Vietnam War, and Mike Chappell's excellent illustrations provide key reference material for the contemporary uniforms and battledress.

Author: Philip Katcher
Illustrator: Mike Chappell
Osprey (Men-at-Arms)

Philip Katcher provides an overview to the conflict that engulfed Vietnam following the division of the country into two along the 17th Parallel in 1954. The uniforms and insignia of the US forces, including the army, Special Forces, air force, navy and marine corps, are dealt with in detail, together with those of the ARVN, the Allied Forces (such as the Royal Thai Army and Korean troops), and also the Communist NLF (Viet Cong) and NVA forces. Mike Chappell's colourful artwork provides plenty of detail to accompany this authoritative text.

Author: Kenneth Conboy
Illustrator: Simon McCouaig
Osprey (Elite)

In 1940 Japan placed Vietnam under military occupation, restricting the local French administration to a figurehead authority. Seizing the opportunity, the Communists organised a Vietnamese independence league, the Viet Minh, whose armed forces became known as the PAVN (more commonly known to the West as the Vietcong, or NVA) and prepared to launch an uprising against the French at the war's end. This text details the history, organisation and uniforms of the People's Army of Vietnam from its origins in the fight against colonialism, through two separate wars against the US and Khmer Rouge, to its role in the modern era.

Author: Charles Melson
Illustrator: Ramiro Bujeiro
Osprey (Warrior)

This volume provides an in-depth look at the experience of the ordinary US marine 'grunt' in Vietnam. Organisation of the corps, weaponry, equipment, uniforms, training and medical arrangements are all discussed. However, where this book differs from other similar works is not only in the detail that it goes into but also in the unifying theme of examining all these differing aspects of marine life from the point of view of a soldier serving in the conflict. The author, Charles Melson, actually served in the Vietnam War (1955-1975), and it is this personal experience that allows him to provide such a unique angle on the subject.

Author: Gordon Rottman
Illustrator: Howard Gerrard
Osprey (Warrior)

Osprey's study of the Viet Cong fighters of the Vietnam War (1955-1975). An enemy in the shadows, the Viet Cong was the military arm of the National Liberation Front, the Communist Party of the Republic of Vietnam. Often generally thought of as local guerrillas, they were also an important part of the North Vietnamese Army regular cadres.

Packed with emotive and rare photographs, this book not only analyzes the skills and tactics of these fascinating fighters, but also takes a look at their social origins to interpret how this affected their behavior as warriors.

Author: Gordon Rottman
Illustrator: Ramiro Bujeiro
Osprey (Men-at-Arms)

Rottman's latest title discusses the original reorganization of Vietnam forces, from the original colonial structure implemented by the French into the first national army of Vietnam. Complete with a detailed history of the command structure and orders of battle, Rottman sheds light on the little known divisional histories of the army through rare, original source material. Moreover, the author examines in detail the evolution of such key units as armoured forces, ranger commands as well as combat unit organization. This, together with a detailed analysis of the experiences of the typical rank and file soldier as well as officer corps, provides a concise and and in-depth history of an army that is too often neglected or quickly judged.

Author: Paul W. Miraldi
Schiffer Publishing, Ltd.

This new, extensively researched volume is a comprehensive guide to the history, development, wear, and use of uniforms and equipment during America's involvement in the Vietnam War. Included are insignia, headgear, camouflage uniforms, experimental items, modified items, flak armor, boots, clothing accessories, paper items and personal items from the year 1965 to 1971, all examined in great detail. Using re-constructed photos the author recreates the look and appearance of the American Soldier in Vietnam. Rangers, medics, scouts, RTOs, machine gunners, Pathfinders, and riflemen are all here and accompanied by detailed text. For the first time, see easily recognizable dating system used by the U.S. Government supply system to date the items on the manufacturer tag. A helpful appendix shows, for the first time ever, all forms of post war gear such as ALICE and camouflage like BDUs and the Rapid Deployment Force pattern, and all those that were never used in South East Asia during the Vietnam War. Included is also an easy to follow, detailed description of each item along with a comparison showing the actual wartime produced item side by side with the undesirable so the collector/Historian/Re-Enactor will never make the mistake of utilizing Post War Produced items again. Packed with over 500 detailed color photographs, and over 100 never before seen original photos from veterans, as well as many close-ups, this book fills an important gap in the collectors reference library and will be invaluable for collectors, living historians, re-enactors, modelers, curators, and artists alike.

Author: C. A. Monroe and Craig Pickrall
The Crowood Press UK

From the beginning of the twentieth century, United States military individual load-carrying equipments were fabricated mainly of cotton duck and cotton webbing. Throughout the First and Second World Wars, as well as the Korean War, cotton-based load-carrying equipments served the infantryman with little change in their design and construction. In 1954 a new load-carrying system was developed to meet the needs of the infantryman on the perceived battlefields of the Cold War. At the onset of the Vietnam War it was clear that this new cotton-based webbing system was not acceptable for use in the humid environment of the jungles of Southeast Asia. The answer to the problems plaguing cotton load-carrying equipments came in the form of nylon. Nylon equipment was found to be more durable, lighter and dried quicker than the standardized cotton equipment. As the Vietnam War ground down nylon web equipment was proving to be the answer to other load-carrying problems that had arisen during the course of the war. In 1973 an all-nylon load-carrying equipment system was standardized replacing all cotton-based load-carrying equipments in service at the time. Since 1973 all load-carrying equipments have been fabricated utilizing nylon and, in effect, closed the history book on cotton-based equipments. In this book, C A Monroe and Craig Pickrall describe and illustrate the personal equipment of the US Army soldier throughout the period, and show how it has developed to meet changing operational needs.

Author: Martin Brayley
The Crowood Press UK

In this book, a follow-up to the same author's well-received study of British web equipment, Martin Brayley gives a detailed illustrated overview of the webbing straps, holsters, carriers and haversacks used by American combat troops from before World War One to the Vietnam War. Hundreds of different items are photographed, and the often small differences between suppliers and periods are pointed in the learned and informative text. This book will be required reading for all students of American uniform and equipment, modelers, re-enactors and collectors.


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