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Listing of WWII Canadian Units

CanadaLetsGo

Following the German invasion of Poland on September 1, 1939, Canada's Parliament supported the government's decision to declare war on Germany on September 10, one week after the United Kingdom and France. Canadian airmen played a small but significant role in the Battle of Britain, the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian merchant marine played a crucial role in the Battle of the Atlantic. C Force, two Canadian infantry battalions were involved in the failed defence of Hong Kong. Troops of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division also played a leading role in the disastrous Dieppe Raid in August 1942. The 1st Canadian Division and tanks of the independent 1st Canadian Armoured Brigade landed on Sicily in July 1943 and after a 38-day campaign there, took part in the successful Allied invasion of Italy. Canadian forces played an important role in the long advance north through Italy, eventually coming under their own corps headquarters after 5th Canadian Armoured Division joined them on the line in early 1944 after the costly battles on the Moro River and at Ortona.

On June 6, 1944, the 3rd Canadian Division (supported by tanks of the independent 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade) landed on Juno Beach in the Battle of Normandy. Canadian airborne troops had also landed earlier in the day behind the beaches. Resistance on Juno was fierce, and casualties were high in the assault waves, in particular the first assault waves, which sustained a 50 percent casualty rate. By day's end, however, the Canadians had made the deepest penetrations inland of any of the five seaborne invasion forces. The Canadians went on to play an important role in the subsequent fighting in Normandy, with the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division coming ashore in July and the 4th Canadian Armoured Division in August. In the meantime, both a corps headquarters (II Canadian Corps) and eventually an army headquarters—for the first time in Canadian military history—were activated. One of the most important Canadian contributions to the war effort was in the Battle of the Scheldt, where First Canadian Army defeated an entrenched German force at great cost to help open Antwerp to Allied shipping.

First Canadian Army fought in two more large campaigns; the Rhineland in February and March 1945, clearing a path to the Rhine River in anticipation of the assault crossing of that obstacle, and the subsequent battles on the far side of the Rhine in the last weeks of the war. The I Canadian Corps returned to northwest Europe from Italy in early 1945, and as part of a reunited First Canadian Army assisted in the liberation of The Netherlands (including the rescue of many Dutch from near-starvation conditions) and the invasion of Germany.

The Royal Canadian Air Force had three key responsibilities during the war: the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP), Canada's contribution to training military aviators; the Home War Establishment (HWE), which provide 37 squadrons for coastal defence, protection of shipping, air defence and other duties in Canada, and the Overseas War Establishment (OWE), which provided 48 squadrons serving with the Royal Air Force (RAF) in Europe, the Mediterranean and the Far East.

RCAF airmen served with RAF fighter and bomber squadrons, and played key roles in the Battle of Britain, antisubmarine warfare during the Battle of the Atlantic, and the bombing campaigns against Germany. Even though many RCAF personnel served with the RAF, No. 6 Group RAF Bomber Command was formed entirely of RCAF squadrons. Canadian air force personnel also provided close support of Allied forces during the Battle of Normandy and subsequent land campaigns in Europe. To free up RCAF personnel who were needed on active operational or BCATP training duties, the RCAF Women's Division was formed in 1941.

Of a population approximately 11.5 million, 1.1 million Canadians served in the armed forces in the Second World War. Of these, an officially recorded total of 42,042 members of the armed forces gave their lives, and another 55,000 were wounded. Many others shared the suffering and hardship of war.

You NEED to have a website for this listing, if you don't have one, let us know and we may be able to help.

Sadly, there seems to be NO Canadian units left
or operating right now. Just sad!!

Marine Corps Legacy Museum -- A GREAT and "must-visit" website for anyone interested in the USMC. Not only on the 'Net, but please, visit their museum -- one of the few Marine museums left in the country as most seem to have been closed. This is a private non-profit museum and they do a damn good job in what they do! Give 'em a visit!

To add your unit link, please go to our link-add page.

If you find a problem in this time/area or would like your unit listed please feel free to e-mail the WW2 T/A webmasters: Harry Coombs or Rob Haught.

Click here to visit: Women's Impressions Main page

2010 WWII and Veterans Weekend (Midwest - Michigan)
The 3rd Annual WWII and Veterans Weekend in St. Clair Shores Michigan is quickly becoming the premiere event in the region. Directors Paul Palazzolo and Jose Evangelista are committed to making it the most enjoyable event reenactors will participate in. Visit website for complete details.
6th Airborne Armoured Reconnaissance Regiment
  During WW2, for the first time, soldiers and equipment were flown into battle by air. In the opening phases of the war, the German armed forces used airborne forces dropping by parachute and landing by glider with great effect to attack targets in western Europe and the Mediterranean.   The United Kingdom was quick to see the advantages such forces could give, and in response, developed airborne forces of her own.  Of the nations who used airborne forces, no-one brought the concept to reality in a manner grander than the United Kingdom.  With larger and more sophisticated types of glider than any other country, the British Army was capable of landing entire mechanized and armored units directly into battle by air.  
  The epitome of that capability was the 6th Airborne Armoured Reconnaissance Regiment, an entirely mechanized, armored unit equipped with light tanks, armored personnel carriers, armored scout cars, jeeps, motorcycle mounted infantry, and it's own artillery in the form of towed 4.2" heavy mortars.  
  The 6th AARR was flown into the Normandy bridgehead on the evening of D-Day, the operation code-named "Mallard", becoming the first-ever unit in history to fly tanks directly into a battle by air.  It fought throughout the Normandy campaign alongside the units brought in by sea, and advanced out of the bridgehead during the "Breakout from Normandy", leading the way to the Seine River.     After the 6th AARR was withdrawn from Normandy to Britain to prepare for further airborne operations, it was sent, in a hurry, back to the continent in December of 1944 to bolster the British and American forces fighting along the northern flank of the Ardennes forest in the "Battle of the Bulge".  Upon completing its mission there, it was again withdrawn to Britain to prepare for further airborne operations.
  In March of 1945, the tanks of the 6th AARR were again flown into battle, this time during "Operation Varsity", the crossing of the Rhine River.  The unit flew into the air head to fight off german counterattacks and operate as a reserve, assisting the airborne infantry where necessary.  Upon the successful establishment of the airhead and the link-up with the 'seaborne' forces crossing over the river, the 6th AARR again led the advance, at the head of the 6th Airborne Division. Leading the division in its true reconnaissance role, it broke out of the Rhine bridgehead and advanced all the way to the Baltic sea, linking up with Soviet Forces advancing from the east, and putting paid to the Third Reich.
  Our club, the re-enacted 6th Airborne Armoured Reconnaissance Regiment, portrays the men and machines of our namesake, to keep alive the memory of those who pioneered the flight of armor into battle.  We are a non-profit organization of volunteers who spend our time and effort collecting and crewing armored vehicles of the type used by the 6th AARR in its operations during WW2.  
  We participate in demonstrations for the public as well as private gatherings of like-minded clubs in Texas and her neighboring states.  Membership is open to all.  

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